April Wine star tells fans – family is more important than music

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Myles Goodwyn performs April Wine classic Just Between You and Me. Ethan Paquet photo

By Ethan Paquet

Nov. 12, 2016

Music saved my life, Myles Goodwyn told a crowd of about 60 people during a book signing in Charlottetown Saturday.

The April Wine guitarist and lead singer was promoting his new memoir, Just Between You and Me at The Pour House, a Charlottetown bar and restaurant.

Goodwyn said he was afraid not many people would show up, as Prince Edward Island is the smallest province in Canada.

“I always love coming to Prince Edward Island, especially trying to sneak off without paying [the bridge toll of] $40.”

While he is not a writer, Goodwyn said it is not hard to write about his memories, and that writing the book has offered insight into a past which he could experience all over again as an intellectual adult.

Goodwyn said in his youth his family was poor and did not have running water.

The family would go to a nearby lake to collect water and boil it on a wood stove to kill the bacteria, and would make snares to hunt rabbits to eat.

A difficult time for the budding musician, Goodwyn said he would spend lots of time by a white granite stone in his backyard,

“It was my happy place.”

Goodwyn said he first experienced music when he saw both The Beatles and Elvis Presley on The Ed Sullivan Show, and was amazed at what he saw.

“When I listened to music on the radio, I was silent until [the song] was over. I didn’t want to interrupt the music, because I thought [the musician] would hear me.”

After receiving his first guitar at age 11, Goodwyn began forming bands, though none were as important to Canadian rock music as April Wine.

Goodwyn said the name of the band was decided as it did not make sense, and all other bands at that time did.

“Led Zeppelin, that one had meaning…April Wine meant nothing.”

Talking about songwriting, Goodwyn said an artist doesn’t know which songs will be hits, but the more successful ones seem to come easier than the ones which may take years to write.

“I knew Just Between You and Me had something special about it because my coffee was still warm by the time I’d finished writing it.”

Goodwyn said he worries about the future of the planet and how it may affect his children.

“Terrorism worries me the most because you can’t beat it.”

He also joked about the recent U.S. presidential election and how he does not support a Trump presidency.

“Two things I don’t like to discuss are religion and politics, but why God allowed Trump to be president, I don’t know.”

After nearly 50 years of performing, Goodwyn said the most important thing he has learned is to spend more time with family.

“After spending time touring, I’d be off the road for only a few weeks and then it would be time to start that cycle over again.”

Goodwyn concluded by performing a small set of songs much to the appreciation of the crowd and signing books and records for the attendees.

 

There are ways to become successful besides college, university, says Jordan Johnstone

By Ethan Paquet

Oct. 4, 2016

A P.E.I. man says college and university aren’t necessary to be successful these days.

Jordan Johnstone, 21, said he finished high school with no idea of what he wanted to do.

“I didn’t have a goal in sight, and I didn’t want to spend money on something I wouldn’t like.”

Instead, Johnstone decided to look for different jobs until he finds what he is interested in.

He is not alone.

A statistic released earlier this year by the National Student Clearinghouse Research Centre shows while more students are completing high school each year, the number of students attending college has decreased, with only 65 percent of graduates pursuing post secondary education.

Today, students can use local resources to become entrepreneurs, something Johnstone says is on the rise.

“If you take a look at something like Facebook, a billion dollar company, you’ll see the creator didn’t need postsecondary to make that.”

Johnstone said while he is unsure of what he would like to do, he feels he he will have a better chance of being happy in life than if he took a course at college that could potentially start a career.

“Most of my friends go to college and they are thousands of dollars in debt. I spend the same amount of time working as they do going to school, and I have no financial troubles.”

Johnstone also believes a lot of courses offered will hold no future to students.

“[The Canadian government] is loaning money Canada doesn’t have to students who are studying for jobs that no longer exist, so obviously they won’t be able to pay it back.”

High school student Matthew Affleck says post-secondary is a must for people to succeed, and does not agree with Johnstone’s philosophy.

“By going to college or university, you open many doors to your future. By not going, you’re just slamming those doors shut.”

Affleck said the guidance counsellors at the school are more than willing to help students find what they want to do, and will meet with students at almost any time to discuss possibilities.

“I just don’t see why somebody wouldn’t want to take [a guidance counsellor] up on that.”

 

 

 

 

Students say college isn’t as important these days

By Ethan Paquet

Oct. 4, 2016

A P.E.I. man says college and university aren’t necessary to be successful these days.

Jordan Johnstone, 21, said he finished high school with no idea of what he wanted to do.

“I didn’t have a goal in sight, and I didn’t want to spend money on something I wouldn’t like.”

Instead, Johnstone decided to look for different jobs until he finds what he is interested in.

He is not alone; a statistic released earlier this year by the National Student Clearinghouse Research Centre shows while more students are completing high school each year, the number of students attending college has decreased, with only 65 percent of graduates pursuing post secondary education.

Today, students can use local resources to become entrepreneurs, something Johnstone says is on the rise.

“If you take a look at something like Facebook, a billion dollar company, you’ll see the creator didn’t need postsecondary to make that.”

Johnstone said while he is unsure of what he would like to do, he feels he he will have a better chance of being happy in life than if he took a course at college that could potentially start a career.

“Most of my friends go to college and they are thousands of dollars in debt. I spend the same amount of time working as they do going to school, and I have no financial troubles.”

Johnstone also believes a lot of courses offered will hold no future to students.

“[The Canadian government] is loaning money Canada doesn’t have to students who are studying for jobs that no longer exist, so obviously they won’t be able to pay it back.”

High school student Matthew Affleck says post-secondary is a must for people to succeed, and does not agree with Johnstone’s philosophy.

“By going to college or university, you open many doors to your future. By not going, you’re just slamming those doors shut.”

Affleck said the guidance counsellors at the school are more than willing to help students find what they want to do, and will meet with students at almost any time to discuss possibilities.

“I just don’t see why somebody wouldn’t want to take [a guidance counsellor] up on that.”