Are you ready for some football? Fantasy league fans are

Drew Rahey, of Syndey N.S., takes one final look at his fantasy football lineup before locking it in prior to the kickoff in the Thursday night game. Ian Beauchesne photo.
Drew Rahey, of Syndey N.S., takes one final look at his fantasy football lineup before locking it in prior to the kickoff in the Thursday night game. Ian Beauchesne photo.

By Ian Beauchesne

Sept 15, 2015

Scott Leeman has been playing fantasy football since he learned how the game works.

“I have been playing fantasy for almost 10 years. I started when I was 11 and it has progressed every year since from just one league to now, this year, I am in four different ones,” said the member of the Holland College Hurricanes football team.

He’s not alone.

Fantasy football allows fans to build a team comprised of the best players from around the NFL and go head to head against friends, co-workers and family members.

Leeman enjoys being able to compete against his buddies on a weekly basis, even though it may cause tension come Sunday.

“The worst, but yet best part, is on Sunday when you are sitting down watching all the action and you have your phone or laptop up just tracking every move made by members of your team as you watch anxiously to try and come out on top.”

Fantasy football dates back to 1962. It is played by over 19 million people every NFL season. Fans can compete in thousands of leagues.

Some involve simply selecting a 14-man roster including a quarterback, wide receivers, as well as a defence and kickers.

Some leagues ivolve weekly drafts of players.

Some leagues add the incentive of money.

Billy Yameen of Haverhill, Mass. says his life changes once football season starts.

“I have three teams this year because last year I had four and felt as if it was too much too handle,” he said.

“I am the one person that takes a week before the draft to map out all possible selections for my team as well as alternative moves in the situation. That happens many times where, I may have my pick snagged by another person.”

It can get complicated.

Some argue taking the best overall quarterback with a first round pick is the way to go. Others will say you need a running back with a first pick.

Teams are operated like an actual NFL team, resting injured players and sitting players on bye weeks. A player who may have struggled against a team can be sat for a player in the same position who has just shredded their opponent for the week.

Drew Rahey of Sydney, N.S. plays the game for the fun of it. He is not worried about whether he comes out on top at the end of the 16-week regular season.

“I mainly just play it because it gives me something else to do and keep track of when it comes time to football season. And I also like ragging on the other guys in the league when I match up against them, and more so if I am able to pick up a big W that week.”

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