Assassins’ game sweeping residence Glendenning Hall filled with paranoia

Devin Rogers spent 30 minutes trying to avoid being tagged in the Holland College residence as part of the assassins’ game. Brett Poirier photo.
Devin Rogers spent 30 minutes trying to avoid being tagged in the Holland College residence as part of the assassins’ game. Brett Poirier photo.
By Brett Poirier
Feb. 3, 2014

Outdoors activities are limited in the middle of winter but the Holland College residence hasn’t had a dry moment all week.
Since Jan. 26, the hallways of Glendenning Hall have been filled with anxiety and fear.
Devin Rogers, a resident life assistant (RLA), planned a game called assassins to get students more active around the building.
“It’s a way to get people out of their rooms and engaging with each other, said Rogers. “The game is deigned to make people more comfortable around the campus.”
The game is simple but has many rules, which keeps the players on their toes.
Everyone playing gets the name of another student, and that is his or her target. From there, the players must track each other down and clothespin one another. Once the user gets clipped, they’re out.
A player cannot be tagged in his or her bedroom, or while in class, making it much more challenging to connect with the target. And if the user doesn’t pin their target in a certain number of hours, they’re also out.
Hannah Steele was out in a matter of hours and has since became and informant to other players.
“Three guys knocked on my door the first day we were playing,” said Steele. “I opened it and then they ran in and circled me, a moment later one took out his clothespin and got me.”
Cases like those aren’t uncommon she said, many other students have become victims because they were to trusting of other players.
“Some people yell ‘I don’t have you, I don’t have you’ and eventually people will let them into the dorm because they believed them.”
Since striking out several days ago, Steele has used her connections around the building to help her friends get an upper hand.
“Everyone will let me in because I’m out. Most people don’t have a problem saying who they have.
I basically know who everyone has,” she laughed.
On day five, Rogers looked to put a new twist to the game. The RLA ran around in a pair of tights and tiny underwear and gave fallen players a chance to return.
He had six golden tickets that players had to chase him down for. Once tagging Rogers, players could return.
Looking back at her experience in the game, Steele has a warning for other players: don’t trust anyone.
Rogers echoed the comments of Steele.
“I was going around putting caution tape on people’s door to get paranoia in the building. This game works best when all trust is lost, and right now it is.”

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